Tuesday, October 28, 2014

52 Ancestors: #43 ~ Phebe Waterman - Research and Questions

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Phebe Waterman was one of the children born to my 4th great-grandparents Dr. Luther L. Waterman and Phebe Barker. She was born on 22 January 1789. At this time, I'm not sure where Phebe was born. In the 1850 Federal Census1 her birthplace is listed as Connecticut. But in the 1870 Federal Census2 her birthplace is listed as New York. Two of her siblings, one born before her and one born after her, were born in Dutchess County, New York.

Phebe married Nathaniel Pierce. Unfortunately, I don't know the date or place of their marriage.

I'm also not sure who their children were. FamilySearch has eight children listed in their family. But, without sources proving they were in fact Phebe and Nathaniel's children, I hesitate to list them here.

I had hoped to find information about Phebe Waterman in the book Waterman Family, Descendants of Robert Waterman, Volume 1 by Donald Lines Jacobus.3 But, in the section about Phebe, Mr. Jacobus stated that Phebe's family was not traced. He did say that they were living in Clayton, Illinois.

I feel fairly certain about the identities of two of Phebe and Nathaniel's children that were included in the list on FamilySearch. They were:
  1. Amanda Pierce (About 1821-1909)
  2. Edwin Barker Pierce (About 1833-1907)
I found Phebe in the 1850 Federal Census living with her husband Nathaniel and son Edwin. This image of the 1850 census shows Phebe and Nathaniel's family living next to their daughter Amanda (Pierce) Selby and her family.


1850 United States Federal Census
Houston, Adams, Illinois

See the far right column? It states that Phebe was deaf. Interestingly, in the 1870 Federal Census, there is no indication that Phebe was deaf. I wonder why. I also wonder if Phebe was born deaf or if she became deaf later in life.

If she was born deaf, I wonder what her life was like as a child. What were her educational opportunities? How did her family communicate with her?

An article in Wikipedia called "History of deaf education in the United States" states the following:
"Before the 1800s, few, if any, educational opportunities existed for deaf children in America. Some wealthy families sent their children to Europe's schools, but many non-high class children had no access to education."
The article also stated that deaf education began in the early 1800s in the United States.

I was hoping to find Phebe in the 1860 Federal Census4 to see if she was listed as deaf in that census as well. So far I haven't found her. I did find her husband and two of her children however. But, Phebe wasn't listed as living with her husband Nathaniel in this census. I wonder where she was.

As you can see from the image below, Nathaniel Pierce was still living next to his daughter Amanda (Pierce) Selby and her family. Nathaniel was also living next to his son Edwin and his family.


1860 United States Federal Census
Houston, Adams, Illinois

By the time the 1870 Federal Census was taken, Phebe's husband Nathaniel had passed away. In this census, Phebe was listed as living with her daughter Amanda and her family.


1870 United States Federal Census
Houston, Adams, Illinois

As you can see, I have many unanswered questions about Phebe and her family. Hopefully I will be able to answer these questions through further research.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved



1 Year: 1850; Census Place: Houston, Adams, Illinois; Roll: M432_97; Page: 119B; Image: 246. Ancestry.com. 1850 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.
2 "United States Census, 1870," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-267-12391-221369-79?cc=1438024 : accessed 27 Oct 2014), Illinois > Adams > Houston > image 31 of 32; citing NARA microfilm publication M593.
3 Jacobus, Donald Lines, and Edgar Francis Waterman. The Waterman Family. Vol. 1. New Haven, CT: E.F. Waterman, 1939. 565. Print.
4 Year: 1860; Census Place: Houston, Adams, Illinois; Roll: M653_155; Page: 979; Image: 635; Family History Library Film: 803155. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census[database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.


Friday, October 24, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 24, 2014


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. English Parish Boundaries: A Little-Known Online Tool by Sunny for Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems Blog
  2. Home is Where Family Begins by Laura Cosgrove Lorenzana for the FGS Voice Blog
  3. Rear view mirror by Rebel Hand for Worldwide Genealogy ~ A Genealogical Collaboration
  4. Back when by Lauren Mahieu, author of genejourneys
  5. Tuesday’s Tip: Try It! Illinois 2014 and Other State Specific Online Database Services AND BIG NEWS! MyHeritage Announces Major Collaboration with 23andMe by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  6. Call for Old Family Photos: Family Tree Magazine Seeks Ancestral Cover Model for 15th Anniversary Issue by Diane Haddad – Genealogy Insider for Family Tree Magazine Blog
  7. A Delicious Side Project AND Escape from the Scanner by Leslie G. Robertson, author of THE PEOPLE OF PANCHO
  8. Everyday Things Then and Now by Kristin Cleage Williams, author of Finding Eliza
  9. Donny Osmond Joins FGS and RootsTech 2015 by Linda McCauley for the FGS Voice Blog
  10. What do you want to read about? by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  11. Creative Ways to Get Your Kids Excited About Family History Month – Part Three by Jessica Murray for Ancestry.com Blog
  12. Emigration to and Within the United States in the 1800s by Lou Szucs for Ancestry.com Blog
  13. Evernote Web Clipper, Skitch and Screenpresso by Shannon Thomas, author of Our Life Picture By Picture
  14. What If They Did? - Monday Musings by Nancy Messier, author of My Ancestors and Me
  15. Changes at the Family History Library - More than Decorative by James Tanner, author of Genealogy's Star
  16. Genealogy Gems Launches Free Genealogy Book Club by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaPress
  17. Is your down-and-out Chicago ancestor in this database? by Harold Henderson, author of Midwestern Microhistory: A Genealogy Blog
  18. DATING AND IDENTIFYING TWO VERY OLD PHOTOS by Linda S., author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  19. FGS Ambassador: Do As I Say by Wendy Mathias, author of Jollett Etc.
  20. Tuesday's Tip ~ View Next Page (for Inquest Results) by Elizabeth Handler, author of A Jewish Genealogy Journey

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview
New Blog Discoveries
In Case You Missed It….My Contribution to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy
and Family History Blog

Thanks for reading!

© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Monday, October 20, 2014

52 Ancestors: #42 ~ Jerusha Waterman – Daughter of a Revolutionary War Surgeon

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small. 

In previous 52 Ancestors posts, I introduced you to
Samuel and Erastus, two of the nine children born to my 4th great-grandparents, Luther and Phebe Waterman. Today, I'd like to introduce you to Luther and Phebe's eldest daughter, Jerusha Waterman.

Jerusha was born on 8 Jun 1786 in Amenia, Dutchess, New York. Her father, Dr. Luther Waterman had served as a surgeon in the
American Revolutionary War. In Luther's pension file, Jerusha is listed as one of his and Phebe's children and on one of the documents she signed her name. In fact, in this amazing pension file, the signatures of all of Luther and Phebe's children can be found. I'll share Jerusha's signature in a future post.

Jerusha married Jonas Smith sometime before 1805. She and Jonas were the parents of nine children. Their first two children were born in New York and their third child was born in Pennsylvania.  The rest of their children were born in Ohio.

  1. Hiram Smith (1805-1878)
  2. Lavina Smith (1807-1880)
  3. Harriet Smith (1809-1888)
  4. Asher Smith (1812-1880)
  5. Jacob Smith (1815- 1882)
  6. John Smith (1817-1880)
  7. Phebe Smith (1819-1883)
  8. Sarah L. Smith (1826-1908)
  9. Amanda Catherine Smith (1832-1905)

Jerusha and her family were living near her brothers, Samuel and David Bassett Waterman, in the 1850 Federal Census for Troy Township, Athens, Ohio.1 You can see her brothers and their families listed below Jerusha's family in the image below.



This is a cropped portion from the 1850 Federal Census showing Jonas and Jerusha Smith and three of their daughters.



Jonas Smith passed away on 8 January 1853 in Coolville, Athens, Ohio, leaving Jerusha a widow for 14 years. In the 1860 Federal Census, Jerusha is listed as the head of household in Troy Township, Athens, Ohio.2 The image below is a cropped portion from that census record. Her daughters, Lavina and Sarah (Sally) were living with her at the time. Also, a young man named Benjamin Humphrey was living with them too. It looks like he was helping with them with their farm.



Jerusha passed away on 1 June 1867 in Coolville, Athens, Ohio. She was buried in Bethel Cemetery which is located in Troy Township, Coolville, Athens County, Ohio.

I'll introduce you to another of Luther and Phebe Waterman's children in a future post.


Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved


1 "United States Census, 1850," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-11779-141880-28?cc=1401638 : accessed 14 Oct 2014), Ohio > Athens > Troy > image 14 of 34; citing NARA microfilm publication M432.
2 Year: 1860; Census Place: Troy, Athens, Ohio; Roll: M653_934; Page: 105; Image: 214; Family History Library Film: 803934. Ancestry.com. 1860 United States Federal Census [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2009. Images reproduced by FamilySearch.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for October 17, 2014


My Fab Finds for this week are (in no particular order)
  1. Redefine Family History Goals for Youth by Devon Lee, author of A Patient Genealogist
  2. I Share DNA with my Adopted Son by Becky Jamison, author of Grace and Glory
  3. New Category: LDS Blogs by Thomas MacEntee, author of GeneaBloggers
  4. 12 Keys to Analyzing the Vitals Section of Historic Newspapers by Kenneth R. Marks, author of THE ANCESTOR HUNT
  5. Naming Relationships by Nancy Messier, author of My Ancestors and Me
  6. Making my Ancestry tree public by Janine Adams, author of Organize Your Family History
  7. Snake Stories by Michelle Ganus Taggart, author of A Southern Sleuth
  8. What Teaching First Graders Has Taught Me About Genealogy by Elyse Doerflinger, author of Elyse's Genealogy Blog
  9. GOOGLE EARTH FOR GENEALOGY AND HISTORICAL MAPS  by Linda S., author of Empty Branches on the Family Tree
  10. Treasure Chest Thursday: Hazel's Quilt by Susan W. Mosey, author of Pages from the Ancestry Binders
  11. Wordless Wednesday ~ Grandfather Out West AND Grandfather Out West ~ Photos #2 by Elizabeth Handler, author of From Maine to Kentucky
  12. WHAT DOES GINI WEBB HAVE IN COMMON WITH HER FAMILY? by Rachael Rifkin, author of Life Stories Today
  13. Creative Ways to Get Your Kids Excited About Family History Month – Part Two by Jessica Murray for Ancestry.com Blog
  14. Enter Our Family History Month Sweepstakes: You Could Win a Genealogy Shopping Spree! by Diane Haddad – Genealogy Insider for Family Tree Magazine Blog
  15. Free access to federal legal materials AND Lessons from the lectern by Judy G. Russell, author of The Legal Genealogist
  16. Estado de Mexico (Mexico State), Mexico Online Genealogy Resources by Moises Garza, author of Mexican Genealogy
  17. Ancestors of Oatmeal Cookies: Oatcakes by Vera Marie Badertscher, author of Ancestors in Aprons
  18. Acquiring Information from a Relative by Claire V Brisson-Banks, author of Budding Genealogists
  19. One Old Postcard by Karen Miller Bennett, author of Karen's Chatt
  20. An "Opalotype" of Everett and Ruth Carpenter -- Friday Fotos (October 17, 2014) by John D. Tew, author of Filiopietism Prism

The 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge by Amy Johnson Crow, author of No Story Too Small -

This week's "May I Introduce To You" Interview

New Blog Discoveries

In Case You Missed Them….My Contributions to the Blogosphere This Week

Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog
Grandpa's Postcards
Jana's Place

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

52 Ancestors: #41 ~ Erastus Waterman's Signature

This is part of the "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" Challenge begun by Amy Johnson Crow, author of the blog No Story Too Small.

Today, I'd like to introduce you to my 3rd great-granduncle, Erastus Waterman. He was the second child born to my 4th great-grandparents, Luther and Phebe Waterman.

Erastus Waterman was born on 6 May 1780 in Connecticut.

On 11 September 1851, Erastus Waterman signed a Power of Attorney document, which is found in Luther Waterman's Revolutionary War pension file. In this document Erastus appointed Mr. John Welch to be his attorney in order to procure any money due to him and his siblings from their father's Revolutionary Pension. Erastus' mother, Phebe, had already passed away by the time this Power of Attorney document was signed.

Here's the Power of Attorney document that was signed by Erastus. About half-way down the page is his signature.



And here's Erastus' signature cropped from the page.



Erastus was 77 years old when he signed this document. He passed away on 13 April 1859 in Coolville, Athens, Ohio.

I don't have any information indicating Erastus ever married. In fact, in the book Waterman Family, Descendants of Robert Waterman, Volume 1, page 563,1 it states the following: "No wife or family have been found." The book also states the following regarding Erastus' burial place: "Gravestone near Coolville, Athens Co., Ohio"

Erastus was living with his nephew John Smith and his family in the 1850 federal census.2 This image shows John's wife Lydia and their children. Erastus is on line four. John is listed on the previous page.



I'll be introducing you to another of Luther and Phebe Waterman's children in a future 52 Ancestors post.

Thanks for reading!


© 2014 Copyright by Jana Last, All Rights Reserved


1 Jacobus, Donald Lines, and Edgar Francis Waterman. The Waterman Family. Vol. 1. New Haven, CT: E.F. Waterman, 1939. 563. Print.
2 "United States Census, 1850," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-266-12328-142003-35?cc=1401638 : accessed 05 Oct 2014), Ohio > Meigs > Salem > image 23 of 34; citing NARA microfilm publication M432.

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